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Seaweed is high in vitamins and minerals – but that’s not the only reason westerners should eat more of it

Rochelle Embling, Swansea University and Laura Wilkinson, Swansea University

Edible seaweeds and algae – or sea vegetables – are a group of aquatic plants that are found in the ocean. Kelp, dulse, wakame and sea grapes are all types of seaweeds that are used in seaweed-based dishes. Continue reading Seaweed is high in vitamins and minerals – but that’s not the only reason westerners should eat more of it

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Vegetarian, pescatarian or low meat diets may reduce cancer risk – new research

Vegetarians had a 14% lower risk of developing all types of cancer compared to people who regularly eat meat.

Cody Watling, University of Oxford; Aurora Perez-Cornago, University of Oxford, and Tim Key, University of Oxford

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

A growing number of people are choosing to eat less meat. There are many reasons people may choose to make this shift, but health is often cited as a popular motive. Continue reading Vegetarian, pescatarian or low meat diets may reduce cancer risk – new research

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Vegan and vegetarian diets may lack certain nutrients – here’s how to get more of them

Martin Warren, Quadram Institute; Kourosh Ahmadi, University of Surrey; Liangzi Zhang, Quadram Institute, and Maria Traka, Quadram Institute

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Vegan and vegetarian diets are certainly trendy, with more people than ever before making the switch. Continue reading Vegan and vegetarian diets may lack certain nutrients – here’s how to get more of them

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Climate change: carbon labels and clever menu design can cut the impact of dining – new study

Cristina Stewart, University of Oxford and Rachel Pechey, University of Oxford

More people cutting back on meat would be good news for the planet, but humans have ingrained habits that are tricky to change. Fortunately, a growing body of research suggests that making changes to the places where we all pick what to eat – such as supermarket aisles, takeaway apps and restaurant menus – can nudge us towards the more sustainable options without us needing to really think about it. These kinds of changes may also attract more public support than policies such as taxes. Continue reading Climate change: carbon labels and clever menu design can cut the impact of dining – new study

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Offering more plant-based choices on menus can speed up diet change

Rachel Pechey, University of Oxford

Rearing meat contributes more greenhouse gas emissions than the production of any other foodstuff. And eating red and processed meat can increase your risk of developing colorectal cancers.

If eating less meat is good for you and the planet, then recent research has some good news: meat consumption – particularly red meat – is slowly falling in the UK. But for diet changes to really pick up the pace, it needs to be easier for everyone to make more sustainable and healthy choices. Continue reading Offering more plant-based choices on menus can speed up diet change